6 results for month: 03/2015


80th Birthday – 1935 News – Oldest Bible

Mrs. L.E. Thornburgh of Four Lakes won the prize for bringing in the oldest Bible in last Sunday's contest at the Christian Church. Her Bible was 134 years old and she was awarded a one year's subscription to the Cheney Free Press. Because she is already taking the paper, Mrs. Thornbugh gave her subscription to an elderly couple at the county infirmary. Mrs. R.E. Shepard submitted the next oldest Bible, published in 1857. The Bible submitted by Sam Webb was published in 1859. It had been given to an uncle by one Thomas B. Hunt in 1861 at Nevada City, in Colorado Territory.  The Bible brought in by Mrs. Ida Bunn dated back to 1871 and had ...

Looking Back – 125 Years Ago

One hundred twenty-five years ago on March 22, 1890 the Benjamin P. Cheney Academy was approved as Washington State’s first Normal School. The term “normal” refers to training the teachers to a norm or a standard, and teachers were given certificates showing they were qualified to teach in the state. Like this story? Support our all-volunteer museum with a small donation here. http://www.cheneymuseum.org/donate.html

80th Birthday – 1935 News – Alcohol Restrictions Lifted

This article was on the front page of the Cheney Free Press in 1935. It was great news for Cheney's businesses. The legislature has passed a repeal of the 1909 statute forbidding the sale of intoxicating beverages within 2,000 feet of the State college or Normal schools.  The bill is now waiting on Governor Martin's signature. Dealers here were glad to hear the news since it is well known that the two other Normal school towns have had beer and liquor stores since last year, after the national repeal of Prohibition. The old law did not affect Ellensburg or Bellingham because their business districts are more than 2,000 feet away from ...

80th Birthday – First Items in the Museum – Oxen Shoes

Oxen shoes from the T.C. Tennison farm near Cheney. Used when oxen had to travel on roads. The Tennison farm later became the J.L. Foulon place. These oxen shoes were found on the old T.C. Tennison farm place near Cheney. Mr. Tennison was a very early pioneer of our district. His farm later became the J.L. Foulon place. Oxen were favored by early settlers because they could haul heavy loads on deeply muddy or rutted trails. They were better than horses at doing the very heavy sod busting needed to first break the bunchgrass fields here. They could also survive unsheltered through all kinds of weather. The Percheron and other draft horses ...

Looking Back – 1940

Starting in 1940, Cheney took advantage of the depression era Works Progress Administration program, using WPA labor to construct a sewer system in the city. The public works modernization project took four years to complete. Like this story? Support our all-volunteer museum with a small donation here. http://www.cheneymuseum.org/donate.html

80th Birthday – 1935 News – Transient Found Dead

On the front page of the Cheney Free Press in 1935, a story of the lingering impact of the Great Depression. Old Frederick Jaeger, 70, and a transient, had spent several seasons around Cheney, living as transients do. This year he had spent the winter in an old horse stall at the Pomeroy race track which he had fixed up good enough for a poor man. Another transient, living indefinitely nearby, had become friendly with the old man who often passed a remark that he once had money. Saturday the transient friend could get no answer from old Frederick's hovel, found the door barred. He notified Officer Ashworth who with Darrel Jerue went over and ...