Cheney Map


1929 President’s House

1930 President's House
This Georgian Colonial style house was completed in 1929 for President, Richard T. Hargreaves and his wife, Edna "Rose" Morrow Hargreaves. The home was occupied by succeeding school presidents until 1987. It then became a faculty club, as well as a special events venue for the college and community. Weddings, receptions, and other special occasions were held in the renamed University House until 1998. That summer, President Stephen Jordan and his wife, Ruth, moved into the President's House, returning it to its original use. The two-story red brick house is 47 by 30 ...

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1958 Garry Hall

Garry Hall was created out of the eastern half of Hudson Hall to house married students and a few single women students. Garry Hall opened in September 1958. It is believed that it was named in honor of Chief Garry of the Spokane Indians. It was created out of the eastern side of Hudson Hall which was acquired as government surplus after WWII to house the large influx of veteran students attending college on the GI Bill. According to Allen Ogden, who was the manager of the hall, there were seven apartments for married couples, in addition to rooms for unmarried ...

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1916 Monroe Hall

Monroe Hall
Monroe Hall was the first dormitory built at the Normal school. It was dedicated February 4, 1916, and housed about 90 women. At this time, the majority of students were women, as teaching was one of the few professions open to single women. Monroe Hall featured a dining room and laundry facility for its residents. Prior to this, all students boarded in private homes, boarding houses, clubs, and “light housekeeping” rooms. People who made a living from providing room and board to students saw this new dormitory as the of killing private enterprise by the state. It ...

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Normal School Gardens

From the very early days of Cheney's academy and Normal school, there was a garden tended by the students. The garden provided vegetables for the school kitchen, as well as hands-on learning and civic participation lessons for the students. The garden was located behind, and slightly to the west of the main school building. Today, that would be between Showalter and Huston Hall. A full row of red and white sweet cherries extends across the ground between the school garden and play grounds. The school garden has been very much improved and beautified this year with the ...

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1947 Hudson Hall

Acquired through State and Federal funding, Hudson Hall was moved from the Kaiser ship building operation at Vancouver, Washington. It opened in 1947 to house veterans of World War II attending school on the G.I. Bill. This campus ghost stood where the mall is today. Following World War II, colleges across the country prepared for a large influx of single and married veterans taking advantage of the G.I. Bill. With federal and state assistance, Cheney met the need through war surplus trailers and buildings. The post-war expansion that began with Trailerville added ...

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1946 Trailerville

We pause here to remember the ghost of the Trailerville community. Following World War II, colleges across the country prepared for the large influx of single and married veterans taking advantage of the GI Bill. With federal and state assistance, Cheney met the need with war surplus trailers and buildings. The post-war expansion began with Trailerville. At the end of 1945, the college received funding to acquire a number of war surplus small house trailers to use as temporary housing. It opened July 1946, and became known as "Trailerville."   &nbsp...

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1948 Rowles Music Building

We stop to remember another ghost building. This was a post-World War II plain, utilitarian brick building, named for William Lloyd Rowles, Head of the Division of Music and Professor of Music. The music department moved from the Showalter Hall music annex into Rowles Hall in 1948. The long side of the building faced 9th Street with its main entrance at the west end. It housed practice and ensemble rooms, as well as studios for private instruction, plus wind and string studios. A wing of the building behind the main entrance held an auditorium. A story in the ...

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1948 Memorial Field House

Another ghost on the campus. This one loomed large in folks memories, not only for the many sporting events they attended there, but also its spectacular end. After World War II, the government had surplus buildings available. One of those was a drill hall at Camp Walgreen at Farragut Naval Training Base north of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Some local boys, including Chuck Shepard were stationed at Camp Walgreen for training in the early days of the war. In April 1947, Eastern Washington College of Education, as it was known then, acquired the building. Gaasland ...

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1888 Red Barn

Red Barn
The barn was built about 1888 by William Bigham for David Hutchinson, the father of Nellie G. Hutchinson. She was a teacher at the Normal School who married William J. Sutton March 3, 1897. A month before their marriage, he had resigned as President of the Normal School and she resigned as head of the Training Department. The barn became part of their farmstead. Sutton had extensive land holdings and oversaw a large farming operation, as well as breeding race horses. Mr. Hutchinson continued to make his home with the couple until his death. William Bigham is ...

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1937 Martin Hall / Lab School

Martin Hall 1937
The new Laboratory School in Martin Hall was a cutting edge facility with the most modern equipment when it opened in 1937. The number of students enrolled in the elementary grades at the Training School continued to grow. By 1930, the Board of Trustees was looking for funds to replace the old 1908 school. However, the Great Depression meant there was no money available from the state legislature. But in 1935, the federal Public Works Administration approved the Trustees' proposal, and work began on a new school. Martin Hall was dedicated to Cheney native, Governor ...

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