Collection Spotlight: Edison Phonograph

Last year we received a number of music players and records. We are delighted to add a new member to our home entertainment collection from Dr. Peter Hansen. Here is a Edison “Diamond Disc” phonograph from about 1914. With it’s 51-inch tall Chippendale style cabinet, this beauty was originally priced at $250. The lower cabinet has two drawers filled with original Edison phonograph discs.  

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80th Birthday – First Items – Carriage Lamp

This black metal carriage lamp was donated by Mary Rich Pomeroy. It is stamped: 08 Diamond, IMPD, C.T.Ham MFG Co., Rochester NY USA. The lamp came from the gig (buggy) of Dr. Francis Pomeroy, who drove a white horse named Charley. Charley always brought the doctor home, even when the good doctor was asleep.

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80th Birthday – First Items – Rifle

This early percussion rifle was converted to shotgun to shoot game birds. The stock was hand-carved. It was used by pioneer, Joseph Chambers who arrived with his family in 1879.  

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80th Birthday – First Items – Vacuum

Vacuum
The 1911 Vacuum Cleaner Here is 1911 high tech. The vacuum works by hand pumping the red knob at the top to create suction. You would then run several strokes across the carpet before needing to pump the vacuum again. It was manufactured by the National Vacuum Cleaner Company. The vacuum was owned and donated by Dr. Francis A. Pomeroy. Well, his name might be on the accession card, but it was really Mary Rich Pomeroy who spent time with the contraption. And it was Mary who donated it to the Tilicum Club in 1935. While this machine ran on hand-pumped suction, we ...

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80th Birthday – First Items – Spinning Wheel

The Great Walking Spinning Wheel Mrs. Laura Stewart Tyler and her husband, John, brought this spinning wheel west with them. They traveled by immigrant train from Indiana to San Francisco, then by wagon to the Four Lakes district, arriving in October 1880. John and Laura homesteaded land east of town. Laura was a member of the Women's Relief Corps, whose donated items started the museum collection in 1935. Help us celebrate many more birthdays by making a donation today.

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80th Birthday – 1st Items – Candle Molds

Candle molds, like this one for making six candles, were used in early 1880s in by the Graham family. A string was fastened in the center and the melted wax was poured in. The wax was allowed to harden, then the candles were removed. Like this story? Please give to our 80 for 80 campaign to help us to keep sharing history.

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80th Birthday – First Items in the Museum – Oxen Shoes

Oxen shoes from the T.C. Tennison farm near Cheney. Used when oxen had to travel on roads. The Tennison farm later became the J.L. Foulon place. These oxen shoes were found on the old T.C. Tennison farm place near Cheney. Mr. Tennison was a very early pioneer of our district. His farm later became the J.L. Foulon place. Oxen were favored by early settlers because they could haul heavy loads on deeply muddy or rutted trails. They were better than horses at doing the very heavy sod busting needed to first break the bunchgrass fields here. They could also survive ...

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First Items in the Museum – Smoothing Iron

Continuing with our 80th birthday look back at the items donated to start the museum collection in 1935, we have a triangular smoothing iron with integrated iron handle. This iron was brought across the plains from Illinois by the Thomas Grier family in 1880. You can help us to continue to preserve these items by making a small donation today, click here.

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80th Birthday – First Items in the Museum – 1892 Receipt

Receipt from the Cheney State Normal School dated February 18, 1892 in payment of $2.00 for tuition for one term paid by Mr. Lasher. Receipt No. 15 was signed by William J. Sutton, Principal of the State Normal School at Cheney. Like this story? Support our all-volunteer museum with a small donation here.

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1st Items in the Museum: 1870 Waterbury Clock

Two of the most important things we do are sharing the stories of the people and the items in our collection, and taking care of those items so they will be here for future generations. Preservation is not glamorous, it is proper shelving, acid free boxes, and cool dry rooms which keep these old items from rusting, cracking, fading, and getting damaged. Your donations pay for the materials to properly store our collection items like this 1870 Waterbury clock which was donated to the museum in 1935. It belonged to William and Rachel Cramer, and we believe it was given ...

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