9 results for tag: 1916


WWI at Home Pt 56

Charles V. Schmitt of Alta Lake, British Columbia was a student at the Normal School when he joined the Canadian Expeditionary Forces on February 1, 1916. He served in France with Company 4 of the 8th Canadian Railway Troops and was twice wounded.

WWI at Home Pt 24

Louis J. Bowler was a 1915 graduate of the Cheney Normal School, where he had been the editor of the Kinnikinick during his senior year. Bowler entered service May 15 1916, serving with the Coast Artillery Corps at Fort Casey, Fort Worden, and Camp Lewis in Washington. He rose to the rank of Captain in 1917 and continued in the Army after the end of the war. Ralph E. Circle enlisted at age 18 on August 1, 1917 at Fort George Wright. He served with the 129th Aeronautic Instructional flying squadron, the 84th Squadron, and the 9th Cadet Squadron at Camp Dick, Texas. Ralph was commissioned as Second Lieutenant while serving with the Head Quarters ...

1916 Monroe Hall

Monroe Hall was the first dormitory built at the Normal school. It was dedicated February 4, 1916, and housed about 90 women. At this time, the majority of students were women, as teaching was one of the few professions open to single women. Monroe Hall featured a dining room and laundry facility for its residents. Prior to this, all students boarded in private homes, boarding houses, clubs, and “light housekeeping” rooms. People who made a living from providing room and board to students saw this new dormitory as the of killing private enterprise by the state. It began the "town & gown" schism within Cheney as students had more of their ...

WWI at Home Pt 3 McClure, Fox & Skinner

A 1916 graduate of the Normal School, Glen Amos McClure (pictured) enlisted in the National Guard at Cheney on June 25, 1916. He served with Company H of the 161st Infantry and arrived in France on December 13, 1917 having already been promoted to Corporal. In February he was promoted to Sergeant. Glen was promoted to Second Lieutenant in October 1918, serving with the 349th Infantry and then Provisional Regiment 1 of the American Expeditionary Forces before returning home in July 1919. Three weeks before shipping out, Glen married his sweetheart Blanche Esther Belden of Tekoa. Normal School student, Charles J. Fox of Davenport joined the Regular ...

Amber Grange 100 Years

The Grange movement began after the Civil War in the United States. The organization gave its farmer members collective bargaining power with the railroads over the price of shipping their produce, as well as bulk buying capabilities. As a group, Granges had political clout with their local and state governments.  Grange organizations introduced and advocated for legislation, not only to help the farming industry but to make sure that all citizens had a greater voice in their government. Most people in Washington State probably don't know that the open primary system we enjoyed for almost 80 years was a Grange initiative that they fought to get ...

Looking Back: The New Wireless Telegraph

We hold tiny computers in our hands, access information and cat videos from around the whole via the internet, and have video conversations with people across the globe. This last item I have just experienced with my husband's French cousin as we work on the family genealogy. She and I exchange text messages, and now face-time using today's new technology. One hundred years ago the world was entering a different wireless age. The age of the wireless telegraph. On June 20, 1916, Ray R. Ames gave a demonstration of his wireless telegraph before a group of Normal school students by both sending and receiving messages. Using radio waves to send the ...

Looking Back: 1916 Train Wreck at Cheney

  From the Cheney Free Press: A fatal and disastrous wreck that occurred at the station of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle railway at South Cheney at 7:43 o’clock Sunday morning, February 20.  The Dead:  Professor Elton Fulmer, Washington State College; L.M. Conry, traveling passenger and agent of Northern Pacific railway, Spokane; J.J. White, accountant, Spokane; B.L. Berkey, salesman, Spokane and Isaac J Minnick, of the US Dept of Agriculture.  Seriously injured:  Dr. John L. Mathews, dentist, lacerations and bruises; R.J. Spears, of Pomeroy, injured about the head; J.A. Payant, Los Angeles, cuts and bruises on the head.  About a score of others received minor injuries of various degrees of severity. The wreck was caused by a rear-end collision between two Northern Pacific trains, which had been detoured over the SP&S line between Pasco and Spokane on account of washouts on the Northern Pacific line which prevented the operation of trains over its own rails.  The trains that suffered the damage were the Burlington’s Kansas City train No. 42 and the Northern Pacific’s North Coast Limited, the fastest train on that system both were east bound....

Looking Back: Monroe Hall 1916

One hundred years ago on February 2, 1916, Monroe Hall, a women's dormitory was formally dedicated. It was named for Mrs. Mary Monroe, Chairman of the Board of Trustees. Prior to this all students boarded in private homes, boarding houses, clubs, and “light housekeeping” rooms around Cheney. The people who made a living from providing room and board to students saw this new dormitory as killing private enterprise by the state. It begins the town & gown schism within Cheney as students had more of their needs met within the school campus and there was less of an interdependency between the town and school.

Looking Back: 1916 Washington State Prohibition

One hundred years ago on January 1, 1916, prohibition took effect in Washington State. Cheney had gone dry in 1910 and the rest of the nation followed suit in 1919. With the ratification of the 18th Amendment.