14 results for tag: Historic Preservation


404 1st Street

The Hubbard-Hansen buildings were erected in 1909 as a single front façade with two businesses. Our focus here is on the east half, 404 First Street. What was here before 1909? Well, nothing, until after 1905 when a small wooden structure on part of the lot held the office of the Cheney Transfer Company, a "draying" or hauling business. Here's a quick list of occupants: 1909-1910 Peter Monk's ladies and gents' furnishings and millinery 1911 - 1916 Jesse G. Campbell's Cheney Cash Store 1916 - 1929 E.N. Guertin's or Guertin's Cash Store. 1929 - 1948 W.J.H. Carr's Cash Store 1949 - 1968 Les Zimmerman's Ben Franklin 1968 - 1969 ...

402 1st Street – Cheney Map

The building you see today, originally known as the Hansen-Hubbard building, was erected in 1909 by Cheneyite, George Yeaman for Charles I. Hubbard and Peter C. Hansen. The one-story brick building was divided into two stores with their entrances facing 1st Street. Our focus is on the left half, 402 1st Street owned by Mr. Hubbard. What was here before? We can go back to 1884 when M. Kaminsky & Son operated a general merchandise store from a one-story wood building on this corner. Kaminsky left town in 1890 and the building was taken over by a dry goods merchant. It was a saloon starting about 1897. In 1904, the building was the temporary ...

Fisher Building to School House Lofts

Hallways retain many of their features, including lockers, classroom doors, and the trophy case.

1920 Senior Hall

Senior Hall was dedicated as the second Normal School women's dormitory on July 9, 1920. While today there is a walkway, in the early days, D Street and automobile traffic passed in front of the building. The hall was used as a dormitory until 1971. While the hall opened in 1920, work on the third floor wasn't finished until 1925 due to financial problems. Senior Hall was a three-story brick, U-shaped building with two entrances that had cast-iron canopies each end of the front, very similar to Monroe Hall. Within the U at the back of the hall, was a sheltered courtyard. During World War II, Red Cross bandage rolling rooms were located in ...

1940 Hargreaves Hall

From the time he became President of the Normal School in 1926, Richard T. Hargreaves wanted to build a modern library for the school. His death on March 4, 1939, midway through construction of the new building, meant that his most ambitious project bears his name as a memorial to his efforts. Mr. Hargreaves was born in England in 1875 and came to America with his family at age eight. After graduating from university, he began his career in education as a teacher in Kansas. He first came to Washington in 1909 as Principal of North Central High School in Spokane. After nine years here, he took a job as a high school principal in Minneapolis. In ...

1929 President’s House

This Georgian Colonial style house was completed in 1929 for President, Richard T. Hargreaves and his wife, Edna "Rose" Morrow Hargreaves. The home was occupied by succeeding school presidents until 1987. It then became a faculty club, as well as a special events venue for the college and community. Weddings, receptions, and other special occasions were held in the renamed University House until 1998. That summer, President Stephen Jordan and his wife, Ruth, moved into the President's House, returning it to its original use. The two-story red brick house is 47 by 30 feet with a 14 x 10 foot one-story extension on the back. In 1946, a two-car ...

1916 Monroe Hall

Monroe Hall was the first dormitory built at the Normal school. It was dedicated February 4, 1916, and housed about 90 women. At this time, the majority of students were women, as teaching was one of the few professions open to single women. Monroe Hall featured a dining room and laundry facility for its residents. Prior to this, all students boarded in private homes, boarding houses, clubs, and “light housekeeping” rooms. People who made a living from providing room and board to students saw this new dormitory as the of killing private enterprise by the state. It began the "town & gown" schism within Cheney as students had more of their ...

1888 Red Barn

The barn was built about 1888 by William Bigham for David Hutchinson, the father of Nellie G. Hutchinson. She was a teacher at the Normal School who married William J. Sutton March 3, 1897. A month before their marriage, he had resigned as President of the Normal School and she resigned as head of the Training Department. The barn became part of their farmstead. Sutton had extensive land holdings and oversaw a large farming operation, as well as breeding race horses. Mr. Hutchinson continued to make his home with the couple until his death. William Bigham is known to have built the original Spokane County Courthouse at Cheney as well as ...

1937 Martin Hall / Lab School

The new Laboratory School in Martin Hall was a cutting edge facility with the most modern equipment when it opened in 1937. The number of students enrolled in the elementary grades at the Training School continued to grow. By 1930, the Board of Trustees was looking for funds to replace the old 1908 school. However, the Great Depression meant there was no money available from the state legislature. But in 1935, the federal Public Works Administration approved the Trustees' proposal, and work began on a new school. Martin Hall was dedicated to Cheney native, Governor Clarence D. Martin on April 6 1937 during a two-day education conference held in ...

1915 Manual Arts / Huston Hall

This, very plain, functional styled building was erected in six months at a cost of $12, 295. It opened in the fall of 1915 housing the Manual Training department and Physical Training. From manual arts to maintenance, to Information Technology, the building has housed many unglamorous, but essential functions of the college. The building you see today, barely resembles the original. The interior has been completed gutted and remodeled, while the exterior has additional wings, as well as other changes. You might expect manual arts to include woodworking, but it also included needlework, basketry, sewing, and drawing. Prior to 1915, the Manual ...