9 results for month: 04/2017


Looking Back 1942 – Winona Hungate

75 years ago, in 1942 Tilicum club member, Mrs. Winona Hungate was named associate American Mother of 1942 in New York in April of 1942. “With her own five sons grown and away from home, she looks out for the welfare of the students of Sutton Hall, men’s dormitory at the college, where she and Mr. Hungate are in charge.” Pictured are Nona Hungate and her husband, Joseph, a Biology instructor at Eastern Washington College.

WWI at Home Pt4 Keinholz, Damrell, Rigg, Ash

Leon E. Keinholz played fullback and was captain of the 1916 Normal School football team. He enlisted in the National Guard at Spokane on March 30, 1917. Corporal Keinholz was attached to Company E 2nd Corps School Detachment of the American Expeditionary Forces in France for a year-and-a-half from December 1917 to June 1919. He was released from service during the demobilization June 26, 1919. Jay Damrell of Cheney was one month shy of his 19th birthday when he enlisted in the Regular Army reserves on March 28, 1917 at Jefferson Banks, Missouri. He served with Troop D of the 7th Cavalry as a wagoneer hauling supplies until he was discharged June ...

1915 Herculean Pillars

This granite structure was the grand entrance to the Normal School in the days when students and visitors arrived on foot from the railroad depot at the other end of College Avenue or from their residences. Soon after the 1896 Normal School building burned down in 1912, students and the members of the Alumni Association came up with the idea to create a memorial to their beloved school using the granite stones from the old foundation. By 1914, they had raised over $1,200, and they hired builder, O.L. Hoof of Spokane to create the entrance. The workmen finished the pillars in time for the May 1915 dedication of the new Normal School administration ...

1929 The Philena

This faded gem was built by businessman and mayor, Clarence D. Martin in 1929, named in honor of his mother, Philena. It was erected as housing for single faculty members of the Cheney Normal School. Mr. Martin chose Spokane architects Archibald and Roland Vantyne to design the 3-story building in a Romanesque style. The brick building has striking arched windows and terra cotta decoration. The front door was originally flanked by two concrete pedestals that held decorative wrought iron lamp posts. The rich interior originally had hardwood plank flooring and painted wood wainscoting. There was a hanging, hexagonal light fixture made of wrought ...

1896 Normal School

It took four years of lobbying and community activism before a new Normal School could rise from the ashes of the first building. It opened in the Fall of 1896, and served the community for just 16 years. This ghost building was beloved by its students and teachers. After the Normal School building, the former Benjamin P. Cheney Academy, burned to the ground in August 1891, the community rallied to deal with the disaster. First, they found space for temporary classes in time to open the fall quarter with a delay of just one week. They also sent a delegation to the legislature in Olympia to secure funding to rebuild. In 1893, the legislature ...

WWI at Home Pt 3 McClure, Fox & Skinner

A 1916 graduate of the Normal School, Glen Amos McClure (pictured) enlisted in the National Guard at Cheney on June 25, 1916. He served with Company H of the 161st Infantry and arrived in France on December 13, 1917 having already been promoted to Corporal. In February he was promoted to Sergeant. Glen was promoted to Second Lieutenant in October 1918, serving with the 349th Infantry and then Provisional Regiment 1 of the American Expeditionary Forces before returning home in July 1919. Three weeks before shipping out, Glen married his sweetheart Blanche Esther Belden of Tekoa. Normal School student, Charles J. Fox of Davenport joined the Regular ...

1915 Normal School

The third Normal School building officially opened May 27, 1915, two years after the destruction of the 1896 school building. The 3-story building held both the administrative offices and classrooms, as well as the school library. The building was renamed for former president, Noah D. Showalter in 1940. On June 27, 1914, some 2,000 dignitaries, teachers, students, and spectators gather for the elaborate ceremony led by Senator William J. Sutton, grand master of the Washington State Masonic lodges to lay the cornerstone for a new Normal School administration building. Salvaged from the ruins of the old building, they also set the 1896 cornerstone on ...

World War I at Home Part 2 – Merle Smith 1915

Merle James Smith, a Normal School student from Portland joined the Regular Army on December 24, 1915. He served in France with Headquarters Company, 162nd Infantry, 81st Infantry Brigade, 91st Division of the American Expeditionary Forces. The cartoon on the cover is from the Normal School Kinnikinick, October 1915.

World War I at Home Part 1

One hundred years ago, on April 6, 1917, the United States entered the war in Europe (World War I.) In support of the war, Miss Alma Alythea Dobbs, the Health instructor at the Normal School, began teaching First Aid classes. About half the girls of the Normal School attended. The classes were designed to prepare the young women to join the Red Cross. The residents of this area, like the rest of the nation had been following the war since it began in 1914. Churches, women's clubs, scouts, and school children had collected money, clothing, and other items to ship to  Europe to help the refugees, particularly those of Belgium and Armenia. N...