22 results for author: Joan


WWI Letter Home – Mashburn

The Cheney Free Press published this letter from Roy Mashburn to his parents: USS Texan May 11, 1919 At Sea My dear Mother: Well, I suppose you will be surprised to hear from me, but being that today is mothers day I am going to surprise you and drop you a few lines. You never can guess what I might do, as you know that I am forgetful, but this is one time that I am not forgetting, ain’t you surprised? Well Mamma, at this very minute I am on the Great Atlantic, somewhere off the coast of France. I think that we are about 800 miles off land, so we have only a few more days of water and then we will be able to see land, and let me tell you ...

Four More Veterans Return from France

Cheney Free Press 9 May 1919 Four Cheney boys - Herman Jensen, Richard Roos, Rodrick Stroup, and Ernest Harr - all of whom left here on October 5, 1917 for Camp Lewis to enter military service, returned home last Saturday, veterans of at least three of the biggest battles of the war, unscratched, healthy, and happy to be home again. All four of the boys went through the war together, in the same company and division, the 361st machine gun company of the 91st division, and fought side by side in each battle in which they were engaged. Entering Camp Lewis on October 5, 1917, they remained there, in training, until July, when they were ordered ...

WWI Letter Home – Roos

The Cheney Free Press published this letter given by the family of Richard Roos: St Martin in view of Bellevue France, January 22, 1919 Dear Folks: Received your letter written December 23. We are still waiting here. Tomorrow we are due to parade before General Pershing. Whether we do or not you will find out next time I write if I don’t forget to mention it. We have seen snow twice over here, but it did not stay on the ground. In fact, the grass and fields are green. I received the pictures ok. I had a sickening hope that we would be mustered out in New York, that’s why I wanted that address, so I could pick up a couple of good feeds ...

WWI at Home, Pt 77

Jim Bair, said his father, Everett Bair, was in New Jersey with the 12th Infantry, ready to be shipped out, when the Armistice ended the war, November 11, 1918. The 12th Infantry was to be deployed to Europe to protect the Trans Siberian Railroad.

1929 President’s House

This Georgian Colonial style house was completed in 1929 for President, Richard T. Hargreaves and his wife, Edna "Rose" Morrow Hargreaves. The home was occupied by succeeding school presidents until 1987. It then became a faculty club, as well as a special events venue for the college and community. Weddings, receptions, and other special occasions were held in the renamed University House until 1998. That summer, President Stephen Jordan and his wife, Ruth, moved into the President's House, returning it to its original use. The two-story red brick house is 47 by 30 feet with a 14 x 10 foot one-story extension on the back. In 1946, a two-car ...

1958 Garry Hall

Garry Hall was created out of the eastern half of Hudson Hall to house married students and a few single women students. Garry Hall opened in September 1958. It is believed that it was named in honor of Chief Garry of the Spokane Indians. It was created out of the eastern side of Hudson Hall which was acquired as government surplus after WWII to house the large influx of veteran students attending college on the GI Bill. According to Allen Ogden, who was the manager of the hall, there were seven apartments for married couples, in addition to rooms for unmarried female students. Hudson Hall at the west end of the complex continued as a men's ...

1916 Monroe Hall

Monroe Hall was the first dormitory built at the Normal school. It was dedicated February 4, 1916, and housed about 90 women. At this time, the majority of students were women, as teaching was one of the few professions open to single women. Monroe Hall featured a dining room and laundry facility for its residents. Prior to this, all students boarded in private homes, boarding houses, clubs, and “light housekeeping” rooms. People who made a living from providing room and board to students saw this new dormitory as the of killing private enterprise by the state. It began the "town & gown" schism within Cheney as students had more of their ...

Normal School Gardens

From the very early days of Cheney's academy and Normal school, there was a garden tended by the students. The garden provided vegetables for the school kitchen, as well as hands-on learning and civic participation lessons for the students. The garden was located behind, and slightly to the west of the main school building. Today, that would be between Showalter and Huston Hall. A full row of red and white sweet cherries extends across the ground between the school garden and play grounds. The school garden has been very much improved and beautified this year with the additional shrubbery that has been planted, and the new beautiful flowers that ...

1947 Hudson Hall

Acquired through State and Federal funding, Hudson Hall was moved from the Kaiser ship building operation at Vancouver, Washington. It opened in 1947 to house veterans of World War II attending school on the G.I. Bill. This campus ghost stood where the mall is today. Following World War II, colleges across the country prepared for a large influx of single and married veterans taking advantage of the G.I. Bill. With federal and state assistance, Cheney met the need through war surplus trailers and buildings. The post-war expansion that began with Trailerville added Hudson Hall in late 1946. The origin of the name “Hudson House” is still a ...

1946 Trailerville

We pause here to remember the ghost of the Trailerville community. Following World War II, colleges across the country prepared for the large influx of single and married veterans taking advantage of the GI Bill. With federal and state assistance, Cheney met the need with war surplus trailers and buildings. The post-war expansion began with Trailerville. At the end of 1945, the college received funding to acquire a number of war surplus small house trailers to use as temporary housing. It opened July 1946, and became known as "Trailerville."       The 8' x 35' tin and plywood painted trailers served as married ...