Cheney’s County Courthouse

Named for a Native American word, Spokane, which means “Child of the Sun," the original Spokane County was merged into Stevens County in 1864. Cheney’s Daniel Percival and Spokan Falls’ John Glover didn’t realize the drama they were setting in motion when they championed a bill in the territorial legislature that recreated Spokane County in October of 1879. Spokan Falls was designated the temporary county seat until there could be a vote of the people in November 1880. A committee of men representing the precincts of the new county met to discuss options. Cheney ...

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404 1st Street

Guertin's
The Hubbard-Hansen buildings were erected in 1909 as a single front façade with two businesses. Our focus here is on the east half, 404 First Street. What was here before 1909? Well, nothing, until after 1905 when a small wooden structure on part of the lot held the office of the Cheney Transfer Company, a "draying" or hauling business. Here's a quick list of occupants: 1909-1910 Peter Monk's ladies and gents' furnishings and millinery 1911 - 1916 Jesse G. Campbell's Cheney Cash Store 1916 - 1929 E.N. Guertin's or Guertin's Cash Store. 1929 - 1948 ...

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Winter Camp of Spokane Indians

Spokane man
In 1959, Sam Webb recalled that back in the 1880s a family of Spokane Indians camped on the site of the new Gibson's Grocery (1011 1st Street) every winter. He said the camp was made up of about 10 to 15 teepees. This site is on high ground near the spring of water that gave Cheney its original name of Willow Springs.  Sam came to Cheney as a boy with his family on the first passenger train on the Northern Pacific Railroad line. The Cheney area is part of the Spokane Tribe of Indians territory.  

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Crunk’s Hill & Cheney’s First School

Photo by Carlene Hardt: Crunk's Hill
Located on the west side of North 6th Street near the corner of Mike McKeehan Way, Crunk's Hill was leveled to create sport fields. There is a plaque at the restrooms. George W. Crunk came west from Tennessee. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War as a Private with the 20th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, Company C. We don’t know when he came west, but by June 1878, he was farming this land with his wife, Annah, and their three children. The Crunk family did not stay long in the area, they moved to Oregon in 1883, but hill is remembered as part of Cheney lore ...

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402 1st Street – Cheney Map

Hansen's Hardware
The building you see today, originally known as the Hansen-Hubbard building, was erected in 1909 by Cheneyite, George Yeaman for Charles I. Hubbard and Peter C. Hansen. The one-story brick building was divided into two stores with their entrances facing 1st Street. Our focus is on the left half, 402 1st Street owned by Mr. Hubbard. What was here before? We can go back to 1884 when M. Kaminsky & Son operated a general merchandise store from a one-story wood building on this corner. Kaminsky left town in 1890 and the building was taken over by a dry goods merchant. It ...

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WWI Letter Home – Mashburn

The Cheney Free Press published this letter from Roy Mashburn to his parents: USS Texan May 11, 1919 At Sea My dear Mother: Well, I suppose you will be surprised to hear from me, but being that today is mothers day I am going to surprise you and drop you a few lines. You never can guess what I might do, as you know that I am forgetful, but this is one time that I am not forgetting, ain’t you surprised? Well Mamma, at this very minute I am on the Great Atlantic, somewhere off the coast of France. I think that we are about 800 miles off land, so we have only a ...

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Four More Veterans Return from France

Earnest Harr
Cheney Free Press 9 May 1919 Four Cheney boys - Herman Jensen, Richard Roos, Rodrick Stroup, and Ernest Harr - all of whom left here on October 5, 1917 for Camp Lewis to enter military service, returned home last Saturday, veterans of at least three of the biggest battles of the war, unscratched, healthy, and happy to be home again. All four of the boys went through the war together, in the same company and division, the 361st machine gun company of the 91st division, and fought side by side in each battle in which they were engaged. Entering Camp Lewis on October ...

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WWI Letter Home – Roos

The Cheney Free Press published this letter given by the family of Richard Roos: St Martin in view of Bellevue France, January 22, 1919 Dear Folks: Received your letter written December 23. We are still waiting here. Tomorrow we are due to parade before General Pershing. Whether we do or not you will find out next time I write if I don’t forget to mention it. We have seen snow twice over here, but it did not stay on the ground. In fact, the grass and fields are green. I received the pictures ok. I had a sickening hope that we would be mustered out in New ...

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WWI at Home, Pt 78

These men, of our districts or attending the Normal School also served during the war in Europe, but we have not discovered information. Can you add to their story? Henry Allen Arland E. Ableman James Leighton Almack of Cheney Eldon J. Belyea William R. Bernard Percy J. Burnell Neil Caplinger (Navy) Archie N. Dake Jack Dowd (Navy) Thomas Grier Joseph W. Hueter Neff Humbert Arthur Jeffries Oscar Jeffries Edwin Kimball Arden Lee of Amber Orval Mast Lewis Montford McCormick Kenneth Melville Wilbur H. Miller Alfred Claude Morley of Tyler Walter H. ...

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Armistice, At Last!

AP photo Celebration in Paris
The war in Europe ended as per the agreement between the waring parties, on the 11th month, the 11st day at the 11th hour. The above Associated Press image is of the celebrations in Paris on that day. Here in Cheney, there was a Peace Parade through the town followed by a carnival celebration that evening in the Normal School gym.

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