68 results for tag: Women


Cheney’s County Courthouse

Named for a Native American word, Spokane, which means “Child of the Sun," the original Spokane County was merged into Stevens County in 1864. Cheney’s Daniel Percival and Spokan Falls’ John Glover didn’t realize the drama they were setting in motion when they championed a bill in the territorial legislature that recreated Spokane County in October of 1879. Spokan Falls was designated the temporary county seat until there could be a vote of the people in November 1880. A committee of men representing the precincts of the new county met to discuss options. Cheney was seen as a good choice as it was easy to access by trails and the coming ...

Crunk’s Hill & Cheney’s First School

Located on the west side of North 6th Street near the corner of Mike McKeehan Way, Crunk's Hill was leveled to create sport fields. There is a plaque at the restrooms. George W. Crunk came west from Tennessee. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War as a Private with the 20th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, Company C. We don’t know when he came west, but by June 1878, he was farming this land with his wife, Annah, and their three children. The Crunk family did not stay long in the area, they moved to Oregon in 1883, but hill is remembered as part of Cheney lore because of an incident in the fall of 1878. In 1915, Mary Cook Spangle spoke ...

Armistice, At Last!

The war in Europe ended as per the agreement between the waring parties, on the 11th month, the 11st day at the 11th hour. The above Associated Press image is of the celebrations in Paris on that day. Here in Cheney, there was a Peace Parade through the town followed by a carnival celebration that evening in the Normal School gym.

Winning the War at School

High school pupils throughout the country can, and must, play an important part in winning this war. The Red Cross stands in need of everybody’s assistance, and it is something to whose support every high school pupil can contribute. Winter is coming on, and thousands and thousands of articles of clothing are needed to keep the soldiers warm. If every young man and every young woman in the country were to help, the supply would not exceed the demand. And, besides the clothing of the soldiers, there is needed equipment for the hospitals. It is almost beyond our comprehension to realize the number of things needed and the great quantities of each. ...

WWI Soldiers’ Christmas Packages

Christmas packages have been mailed by the girls of the high school to 28 graduates and ex-high school pupils who are now in service. Each package contained a trench mirror, a can of talcum powder, a shaving stick, and a tube of toothpaste. - Blackhawk December 1917 The girls of the Normal School Yep Kanum club have been doing their bit for Uncle Sam. At Christmas, the girls filled and sent away to the Normal School boys in service, sixty bags. Besides, they have made many a sweater and other knitted things for the Red Cross. And while doing all this work, they have met together for chats and good times. We’re the Yep Kanum The joy Yeps at ...

WWI Red Cross Day in Cheney

Have you ever thought that one reason people do not respond to certain movements is because they do not come in touch with those movements? That the reason people do not feel together, act together for some cause, is because that cause is not brought to their door? That is what our able Red Cross committee thought when they were formulating plans to raise Cheney’s $2,000 apportionment. There were in the adjacent rural districts intelligent, prosperous farmers who would contribute generously. But how are they to be reached? By mass meetings? Yes, some of them. By literature sent to them? Yes, a few of them. The only practical way seemed to go to ...

1920 Senior Hall

Senior Hall was dedicated as the second Normal School women's dormitory on July 9, 1920. While today there is a walkway, in the early days, D Street and automobile traffic passed in front of the building. The hall was used as a dormitory until 1971. While the hall opened in 1920, work on the third floor wasn't finished until 1925 due to financial problems. Senior Hall was a three-story brick, U-shaped building with two entrances that had cast-iron canopies each end of the front, very similar to Monroe Hall. Within the U at the back of the hall, was a sheltered courtyard. During World War II, Red Cross bandage rolling rooms were located in ...

1916 Monroe Hall

Monroe Hall was the first dormitory built at the Normal school. It was dedicated February 4, 1916, and housed about 90 women. At this time, the majority of students were women, as teaching was one of the few professions open to single women. Monroe Hall featured a dining room and laundry facility for its residents. Prior to this, all students boarded in private homes, boarding houses, clubs, and “light housekeeping” rooms. People who made a living from providing room and board to students saw this new dormitory as the of killing private enterprise by the state. It began the "town & gown" schism within Cheney as students had more of their ...

1908 Normal Training School

The Normal School Training School served as a regular elementary school for Cheney residents, as well as a hands-on training facility for the student-teachers of the Normal School. This ghost once stood on the west side of Showalter Hall where the parking lot is today. The Normal School Training School department was first organized in 1892 with Miss Nellie G. Hutchinson as its first principal. The student-teachers observed classes being conducted, then they would step in to teach themselves while being observed by their instructors. By 1907, the department had outgrown its space in the main Normal School building. Completed during the summer of ...

Looking Back 1892

One hundred twenty-five years ago, in 1892,  the first class graduated from the State Normal School at Cheney. There were three graduates: Kate D. Brace, Grace M. Nichols, and Elizabeth O. (Hamblen) Shaw.