11 results for tag: teachers


First Tyler School

The Stevens School District #19 was established in 1880. The school held 1st through 8th grades. The district was renamed to Tyler along with the renaming of the town in 1892. Directors of the school in 1904 were Henry Boston, James E. Carmen, James Abbott, and John Moreland. In 1911 the school board was advocating for a new school at a new site or extensive remodeling of the current site. The board gave its reasons, First, the sanitary conditions demand it, there being two barns and four outhouses within fifty or one hundred feet from the school building, with two manure piles and a cesspool drained through the school yard. Second, the school ...

Crunk’s Hill & Cheney’s First School

Located on the west side of North 6th Street near the corner of Mike McKeehan Way, Crunk's Hill was leveled to create sport fields. There is a plaque at the restrooms. George W. Crunk came west from Tennessee. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War as a Private with the 20th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, Company C. We don’t know when he came west, but by June 1878, he was farming this land with his wife, Annah, and their three children. The Crunk family did not stay long in the area, they moved to Oregon in 1883, but hill is remembered as part of Cheney lore because of an incident in the fall of 1878. In 1915, Mary Cook Spangle spoke ...

WWI at Home Pt 60

Harris C. Christopher graduated with the first class of official high school graduates at Olympia in 1909. He graduated from Washington State College at Pullman with a bachelor degree in science in 1915. Before coming to Cheney High School as a physics teacher, he had taught in Mason County, Endicott, and Wilbur. Harris Christopher was a 28-year-old teacher with the Cheney School District and a farmer when he was inducted into the Army April 26, 1918. He served with the Medical Department Infirmary #7 at Camp Lewis and then the 51st Battalion Infantry at Camp Grant, Illinois until his discharge December 4, 1918. After the war, Harris Christopher ...

WWI at Home Pt 20

Hugh A. Scaborough joined the faculty of Cheney High School in January of 1917, filling a vacancy following another teacher’s resignation. He had come west from Iowa in June 1916 after working as a reporter for the Red Oak, Iowa Express. He taught manual arts and physics, as well as much of the athletic department during the year he was at Cheney. Scarborough joined the Washington National Guard on July 24, 1917. He was sent overseas with Company H of the 161st Infantry, arriving January 28, 1918. At war’s end he served with the Headquarters Battalion for the American Commission to Negotiate Peace until August 20, 1919. From the Editorial ...

1948 Rowles Music Building

We stop to remember another ghost building. This was a post-World War II plain, utilitarian brick building, named for William Lloyd Rowles, Head of the Division of Music and Professor of Music. The music department moved from the Showalter Hall music annex into Rowles Hall in 1948. The long side of the building faced 9th Street with its main entrance at the west end. It housed practice and ensemble rooms, as well as studios for private instruction, plus wind and string studios. A wing of the building behind the main entrance held an auditorium. A story in the Kinnickinik yearbook stated "The music hall is open to campus personnel, as well as ...

1908 Normal Training School

The Normal School Training School served as a regular elementary school for Cheney residents, as well as a hands-on training facility for the student-teachers of the Normal School. This ghost once stood on the west side of Showalter Hall where the parking lot is today. The Normal School Training School department was first organized in 1892 with Miss Nellie G. Hutchinson as its first principal. The student-teachers observed classes being conducted, then they would step in to teach themselves while being observed by their instructors. By 1907, the department had outgrown its space in the main Normal School building. Completed during the summer of ...

Birth Anniversary – William Sutton

Today is the one-hundred fiftieth anniversary of the birth of William J Sutton. He was the Principal of the Cheney Public School from 1887 to 1890. He then became the Principal of the Cheney Normal School from 1892 to 1897. He taught History and Philosophy of Education. He was a charismatic and beloved teacher, though he could also be stubborn and strong-willed. He is credited for keeping the Normal School operating through the funding veto of Governor McGraw in 1893. Sutton served in the State Senate starting in 1913, where he once again persuaded the legislature to overturn an appropriations veto of for the Normal School. Senator Sutton ...

Looking Back – 125 Years Ago

One hundred twenty-five years ago on March 22, 1890 the Benjamin P. Cheney Academy was approved as Washington State’s first Normal School. The term “normal” refers to training the teachers to a norm or a standard, and teachers were given certificates showing they were qualified to teach in the state. Like this story? Support our all-volunteer museum with a small donation here. http://www.cheneymuseum.org/donate.html

80th Birthday – First Items in the Museum – 1892 Receipt

Receipt from the Cheney State Normal School dated February 18, 1892 in payment of $2.00 for tuition for one term paid by Mr. Lasher. Receipt No. 15 was signed by William J. Sutton, Principal of the State Normal School at Cheney. Like this story? Support our all-volunteer museum with a small donation here.

Discoveries in Cataloging: Opening the Big Trunk 25

 These formal trousers belonged to William Sutton.  They are black wool crepe, and appear to be part of a formal suit.  The trousers have black decorative tape down the side seams, 3-button fly, one slash waist pocket, two side seam pockets, two back welt pockets, and six waist buttons for suspenders.  The label attached to underside of lining of the waist pocket states “Guaranteed by The House of Kuppenheimer. W.J. Sutton, 6/7/24”   The inseam is 33.5”, and the waist is 40”.  It would appear Mr. Sutton was not a particularly tall man, and had some girth. Wm Sutton, 1925 Our collection has a ...